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The History of Rum – Part Two – Navy Rum

Ahoy Legends!

As we continue to peel back the layers of that drink we all love – today I am going to tell you about “Navy Rum”.

Depending on how many you have had already, it shouldn’t surprise you that Navy Rum was a product of the British Royal Navy in the 1600s.

Prior to 1655, the drink of preference for an old salt was French Cognac but after the Brits seized the island of Jamaica they quickly substituted Cognac for the good stuff.

Rum has enjoyed a rich history but perhaps none finer than the legend of Horation Nelson who died at the Battle of Trafalgar. Although he won the battle, he didn’t get a chance to enjoy the fruits of his success. His loyal troops decided to preserve his body in a vat of Rum for the journey back to Blighty. Things didn’t go exactly to plan – when they cracked the cask open in England they found it be empty (except for old Horatio). Did he drink it from the after life? Did his body absorb the Rum? None of the above – the crew had drilled a hole in the bottom and drained the Rum off during the journey home. We like their #endeavour! To this day some still call Rum “Nelson’s Blood”.

So next time you raise a glass of the good stuff and salute Lord Nelson with a tot of Nelson’s Blood!

Pictured above – Hot Buttered Rum – a healthy shot of our spiced, mix with hot melted butter and brown sugar, boiling water, season with nutmeg and cinnamon.

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